Get Out N Drive Podcast

Camp Teague, Lily Impellizzeri, and Jordan Hutton Racing Towards Their Future #WhatDrivesYOUth

October 29, 2023 Car Podcast
Get Out N Drive Podcast
Camp Teague, Lily Impellizzeri, and Jordan Hutton Racing Towards Their Future #WhatDrivesYOUth
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Show Notes Transcript

Ride along with Jason OldeCarrGuy Carr & John CustomCarNerd Meyer as they take a few laps around the track with not one, not two, but THREE of the newest names in racing as part of our #WhatDrivesYOUth interview series.

KLR Management brought it when they introduced us to Jordan Hutton, Lily Impellizzeri, and Camp Teague, three of the newest names you NEED to know in the racing world. Find out what it takes to get started in the racing world and how you explain missing school to attend a weekend race.


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Transcript 

Announcement 

You're listening to the Get Out N Drive Podcast with John CustomCarNerd Meyer and Jason OldeCarrGuy Carr. We'll be bringing you gearheads, everything you never wanted to know about cars and why they should be on the road and not in your garage. Are you ready to Get Out N Drive?  

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John 

Welcome back to another Super Fantastic, fun filled ridiculous episode of the Get Out N Drive Podcast. I am John  CustomCarNerd Meyer. 

Jason 

And I'm Jason OIdeCarrGuy Carr. 

John 

We've got several people with us here today and we're always talking about Supporting the next generation, we're always talking about what drives youth. And Kyle Lockrow Racing has been good to us. For quite some time and he has introduced us to Jordan Hutton. Camp Teague. And Lily Impellizzeri. So I mean, everybody altogether I'm certain you won't jump in all at one time, but. You're new to racing. I'm seeing that. Everybody's here. I'm reading everyone's bio and everybody is within a year or two. Is that correct? Lily? How long? How long have you been? Racing Lilly. 

Lily 

I've been racing for almost three years now. Wow and sometime. 

John 

And Jordan, what's your background? 

Jordan 

I did a lot of drag racing actually, when I was a kid, so I've been racing since I could walk. But doing Sprint car racing on dirt, this is my third complete year. 

John 

When you say drag racing you ran in junior dragster circuit. 

Jordan 

Yes, Sir. Grand junior. Drag searched for about three years and then the fun kind of was out of it and moved the dirt Oval. 

Jason 

It's hard to have an interview with three people at once because you wanna ask a question and you wanna hear everybody's answer. But we wanna try and take it one at a time. So Jordan, I'm gonna start with you. Just because on my screen. You're on the. Top so you started with Junior dragster and you moved around in in your racing career. If you don't mind me asking, how old are you now? So 18 years old, you've been racing basically. As long as you can remember. At what point do you realize that? You know I. Want to move from this style? Racing to that style racing? Was there any pivotal moment that said? You know, I want to get out of the straight line. I want to go to Circle track racing. 

Jordan 

So it got. To the point where it was actually me and my father racing at the time and he got to the point where he was winning and it just got boring for him. We did a lot of bracket racing around us and I struggled and it was just the money to, I mean blowing 50 grand in a junior dragster. We just couldn't afford it so. We drove him, drove by Fulton Speedway and we're heading towards uh Cicero. And we saw Pat work. Chop pulled in there and we saw his holler and everything and it just hooked us. He guided us where to go and everything, and then we went from there and we did a lot of Oval cart racing and we loved it. And then I knew it was time to jump up when it started getting boring and the Oval carts on, we went straight from the Oval carts right to the Sprint cars. 

John 

So I know you mentioned someone or they currently like someone who is a mentor. Are they? Are they working with you as a mentor or how are how are? They helping your career? 

Jordan 

He was kind of just like a guy that, you know, 10 year old kid just went and watch the races and he did really well. So I kind of. I like how he raced and I liked what he did. He's actually a Hall of Famer around here for a dirt big block, modified racing, but he's kind of the one that like, hooked us in to go and do it. Just seeing how nice people were in all the racing was kind of a big. Hook for us. 

John 

Did he? Did he open doors for you to and kind of put you in front of other people? 

Jordan 

He actually showed us. He gave us the number to our local cart way. Then he gave us a couple numbers to find other cart ways, carts to buy good people to contact, good connections to start. Off with and. We had a lot of success in go karts. Honestly, my third ever race I went from. 10th to 1st and the junior classes and we did pretty well. In go carts. 

Jason 

In camp, one thing I noticed that I when I was reading through the little bio that was given to us is the first thing I wrote down was that you're not from a car family. But yet here you. Are racing. How does that even happen? 

Camp 

You know, it's, it's funny. I was. You know, I'm originally from Mississippi. You know where racing is, just not a thing, right? It's just it's all about football down there, right? So when I was a car guy, my parents didn't really know what to do. So, you know, luckily we had a bunch of friends we moved to North Carolina when I was about five years old. We had a bunch of friends who were super in the cars. They were in a racing and you know, so I kind of. Got into that world through them. It's been. It's been interesting for sure. It's definitely a. Different, at least from experiences that I've heard from other people for sure. 

John 

Not being in a car family camp. Did you have to do? Explaining to your family, like, trust me, man, this is cool. 

Camp 

I still have to OK every day, yeah. No. Yeah, they don't really get it. It's OK though. You know, we all. Come from different walks, but. Yeah, ever since I was a kid, I was like Mom, I really like racing cars or who, like, racing cars. She's like, what does that even mean? Like, that's. What people in Europe? Do. But, mom, what? Look at this look. At this it's so cool, but they've come around to the idea of it a bit more now to see how hard I've been working at. It and what all. Doing so, they're definitely supportive of it. I don't want to say they're. Not supportive of it, they just. It's just they don't necessarily get it, I guess. 

John 

They may not understand it like there's most to my family that I say what I do and people say, huh, you know what? What? Why? How can you sit around for hours and hours and hours and talk to somebody about a car? That that's the thing that's going to work. It's the thing that takes you to the grocery store. 

Speaker 

Right. 

John 

OK, we're done. 

Camp 

Right. Yep, very much. 

Jason 

Well, and not to mention the fact that now that you're in, you know you're in the. South, basically and. You said North Carolina is where you're at now. 

Camp 

Yes, Sir, I live in. 

Jason 

North Carolina. So you're in prime time racing country per se, so it's hard not to be a part of that growing up today and having that all around you no matter what you're doing. Lily, let's jump over to you for a second. I want to find out, I think you're the youngest of the group. 

Speaker 

Yes, Sir. 

Jason 

But here you are. You said you've been racing for three years. What got you into racing? 

Lily 

You're probably going to be surprised by this, but it was actually a video game that got me into racing. I got this game called Project Cars, Project Cars 3, because I see it in a GameStop magazine I was like, hey, Dad, can we get this game he's like? 

Speaker 

OK. 

Lily 

Sure, why not? And so we sat there, we played the game for a while. I was like, look. At the I'm. Great at this. He was like, OK, took me go karting. I still say this Tuesday that that the GO Kart they put in me was just like overpowered cause they just refilled it with gas. He was like, I probably lapped him like around three times. And then we went high speed. Go karting where you know where like the horns and helmets all that. And we did 2 rounds. And on the second round I came back off the track and I went to the owner and I was. Like my cart wasn't as fast this time. He pulled my dad over and he was like. Her times were .2 seconds faster every lap. The tracks already slowed down for getting a race car, and then he just did research and found the bandolero and just kind of like threw me in it and. 

John 

Said good luck. Now we were talking off screen a little bit, Lily, about the bandoleros because I love watching the Legends cars, they look like. Like 5/8 scale or whatever the scale they are of 30s era cars. Is your car chassis wise set up generally like a legends car or do you have specific differences for your bandolero. 

Lily 

Specific differences. Like how legend cars, they have their engines in The front of them. Well, with Bandoleros, our engine is not in the front  It's actually in the back. So legends I think they're front wheel drive cars don't count me on that cause I'm not too. Sure about that. But Bandos were actually rear wheel drive cars, so and we only have one brake, so I mean like when we get slammed on those brakes, all we spin out. Like it is. Nothing 

John 

. Yeah, your break is inboard. Left rear. Correct. And. And are you running circle track or do you do you turn right every now and then? 

Speaker 

Tell me. 

Lily 

I run for right now just Circle tracks, but in January we'll hope. We're hoping to take you down to the winter heat that a national event that's held on the Charlotte, Louisville. 

John 

Because I'd love to see how the Bandoleros handle because I've never seen one on a road course I'd love to see one set up for turning Right. 

Lily 

Trust me, I would like to see one too. If I'm being honest. 

John 

I would, I would guess they'd set up and they would run. How? How the engine is placed. They would run like a side by side or something and they have good weight placement. 

Lily 

So we have weights in my car, so we have them like evenly distributed out and I. So I mean, like the weight on it, it's pretty even. So I mean it's not like it's leaning to one side where it's just gonna like spin out and like random stuff like that. 

John 

Right. But when you're, but when you're running an Oval course, you're turning left. The thing handles pretty good, it doesn't put. Good. Awesome. 

Jason 

So, Jordan, what we talked a little bit about the you know how you kind of get into the circle track racing. Why don't you tell our audience what? It is that you're. Racing today and how that compares to you know where you started, maybe it is in the same class of where you start, but tell us a little bit what your. 

Jordan 

So present day I'm racing third Sprint cars. I'm running 305,  360s and soon to be hopefully some 410 action, but it's totally different animal. You know the go karts. You're 2 inches off the ground, you feel everything right on your **** and it's totally different. No shocks, nothing and then. Sprint cars. You have portions and you have shocks. You have big wings on the top of them to push the cart down. It's totally different. The only thing I ever carried over from my go Kart was the consistency fact. The go Kart on dirt you have to be so consistent every lap. Nail your mark. I mean 1/10 of a second thumb thinks. Is half track it seems. And that's the biggest thing that I noticed. The difference in is that the go karts. I feel like I started better off kind of going from go karts straight to the Sprint cars because I was a lot more consistent starting off than a. Lot of people. Were and that was a huge benefit for me. 

John 

Jordan, you're running sprints on dirt. Yeah. OK. Because I know I've. I've seen a couple of them that that have run. Very few, but some that have run on asphalt, but. OK. Are you're. You're obviously getting used to pretty quickly handling that thing through the corners. 

Jordan 

Yeah, it's definitely different. And the bigger motor, you get more horsepower, the more it actually wings over and it allows you to kind of get in there a little bit harder, which is different for me. But I've gotten a handle of the 305 and still working on the 360. 

John 

Right. Yeah. Cause I see a lot of people breaking late and just throwing it into the turn and then and learning you know how to handle the car and where to come. 

Jordan 

Yeah. With the 360, they're like 780 horse. So the quicker you get going, the harder it actually plants the left side into the ground. And when it does that, it actually turns harder and it keeps you in track. So the problem with that is you have to find a very fine. Margin to be able to run consistent fast lap because if you hold it wide open you go and throw out the corner, you're going to get in fine, but you're gonna come off real tight and get in the wall. But if you let out too early, then you're going to push up and coming into the corner. 

John 

Right. Are you more of a low track driver or you run in the middle? 

Jordan 

No, I actually like the top. I love being on the top. I love the thrill of it. 

John 

That's yeah, you get pretty loose. Up there quick. 

Jordan 

Yeah, I love it when there's a big cushion up top that you can just go up there and smack into it on this. Thing in the world. 

John 

Yeah, very cool. 

Jason 

So a couple of times you mentioned or was it 305, 360, 410 explain not just to me but to our listeners who might not know exactly what you're talking about. I'm assuming it's different Classes of Sprint care. 

Jordan 

Yes.  

Jason 

So tell me a Little bit about what those differences are. Between those three classes. 

Jordan 

So a 305 is kind of. Like your beginner. Class, but it's more now formed into a. Beginner class but kind of like a kind of like the ARCA series is the way I look at it. It's our ARCA series, but they're about a little bit less than 500 horse from the grade 305 motors. We're pushing 500. There's no cockpit adjustables and. There's no communications, nothing and dirt Sprint car racing. But now your 360 classes start to get a little bit more complicated. And around here you can have in cockpit adjustable so you can adjust all four shocks while you're racing and you can adjust your wing forward and backward. Now the floor 10 aspect there are 900 plus horse. And depending on the series you run, you can have in cockpit adjustables, but all 360, 410 cars you can have wing sliders. Your 410s series is your, you know, NASCAR Cup series. 

Jason 

Wow, that's pretty amazing thing to go from a 500 horse car up to 900 plus, but it's like you said, it's like it's like driving in the different series of NASCAR Arca and you move into your trucks and Bush. Or whatever I'm going. Way back at my age now here, Craftsman truck. And. Infinity and up into the Cup series and you're basically racing very similar chassis. But power weight ratings like all that different stuff is just so much different in those different classes and by the sounds of things you seem to have found. 

Speaker 

Your groove so. 

Jason 

To speak not just on the track, but your whole racing in in these cars. Do you think it's something you're going to stick with as far as the sprints? Is there or do you have aspirations to go? Further into different class of racing. 

Jordan 

I definitely think I'm gonna stick with the Sprint cars, but I'm. I don't know. I'm just a kid that likes to be there. You know? I like going to different races even when I'm not racing. I like being there. I'd like to kind. Of try some other things than just dirt Sprint car racing, but I think no matter what, I always my heart will. Always be there. 

Jason 

Yeah, look at Tony Stewart. That's where he started. Not free that now, so. 

John 

How much is it to pay attention? To racing and you're adjusting your car. 

Jordan 

Yeah, it's when I first moved into the 360 class two years ago. We went to. A. We ran out of track and that's actually what I practiced on my first session. I kind of had a good idea what the car would do because I had a little bit of a less horsepower motor. It was only like 650, so that's not that big of a jump from my 3:05. I went into the corner. I'll come out and the only time you can actually adjust your wing is when you're turning. So the only time you can adjust your lengths throughout the corner so that took me couple laps to get used to and getting the read them down which way it is because on my first car if you went forward with your slider push the link back and that messed me all sorts up the first session I kept going the wrong way that beat myself up. But the shock is even bigger thing. You're going down the straight away and you actually have to feel the clicks in your. Hand while you're going down and it's. It it's something else it takes and I give total props to guys that are amazing at it. I mean one of the guys that helped me out in my 360 Jason Barney, he's one of the best guys at it. I mean his notebooks, this big and it's just crazy, the stuff that. He knows. 

Jason 

That's kind of like driving an old Model T. Yeah, you got all these little throttle and spark and all that stuff. You're always constantly adjusting as you're going. Down the road. 

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John 

You know, Jason, we sure get to Talk a lot. 

Jason 

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Who me? 

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Jason 

Camp. Tell us about where you're at with your, with your racing. What is it exactly? That you're racing. And tell us a little bit about. 

Camp 

That car racing any number of things right now, primarily we're focusing in Champ Car. Right now, but I've raced a Crown Vic majority of the time. It's been pretty fun. It's a big car. But it's really cool, you know, it's got the V8 up front and you know, it's really easy to control. You know, it gets out and you can you can feel it getting out. It's easy to control. It's really a great. 

Jason 

Car to drive? Yeah, so. You're you. You talk a little. Bit about champ car. So let's kind. Of must be your bread and butter of your. Racing at the moment. 

Camp 

As of right now, yeah, you know, it's one serious reason. 

Jason 

Talk. Talk a little bit about it. Tell us what? What it is that you're? That you're doing there. How did you get there? I guess should be the first question. How? 

Camp 

Did you get into the Champ car? You know, believe it or. Not I work at. Ford Racing school. So that's kind of how I. I've got. I was on Facebook and I'm just meeting all these people on Facebook and I actually just ended up messaging Kyle Lockrow, who manages me. And I went down to CMP and just to watch a Champ car race just to be in the environment. Meeting people and learning about the sport and then a few months later, I've messaged this guy on Facebook about just. Seat just being on the seat and so he let me come on without any experience. We ended up doing really well that race. We ended up finishing second. So it was pretty good for my first race. But it's a lot of fun. It acts like a more professional series. It's, it's a. It's a good time for sure. 

John 

Do you feel it feels like a more professional series because it is a full size car, full size, front engine rear? Drive V8. 

Camp 

In in terms of the rules that. They have. It's a little more professional compared to lemons, 24 hours of lemons stuff. Like that. It's, you know, people take it. You know, there's a lot of guys that take it seriously and there's people that compete in or that race and stuff like that if they need seat time on a certain track, they come race champ car to prepare for their race. Your racing gets big guys with bigger names and. So you get a lot of experience against these big guys in this series, so it's treated more professionally. 

Jason 

Well, I think professionalism might tend to come in from different aspects of the racing and I'm just looking at the, the, the partnership pricing. I'm not going to go over that. Or discuss that on the air. Some of. These are. Are pretty pricey for sponsorship partnerships I guess to do what you're doing and I was very surprised to see those zeros behind the per event racing, so this is this is pretty serious stuff like these. These are entry levels where companies. Want to jump on board to get their names out there? To become a partnership with what it is that you guys? Doing. Can you tell us who your prime primary sponsorship is on your car today? 

Camp 

Yeah. I mean, KLR management is our big sponsor and but like kind of umbrella under that we have Max Papas innovations, Alpine stars, VV Jct. Those are kind of our guys that we partner with there and of course we're. Always looking and searching for anyone else who wants to partner, you know, help is always wanted, but as of right now, that's kind of where we're sitting and it's been really great. Great. They're great people to work with. 

John 

They really are 4 champ cars. What are parameters or different cars that are used? Is that? It's mostly the Panther platform cars or what? What is? Tell our listeners what is parameters of. 

Camp 

That class so it's. Any variety of cards, right? Like you'll have it's class racing. So kind of. MSA Esque if you say you know the fast cars are in a higher class and then you slower, slower, slower kind of thing. And so you. Have class winners and then overall winners and kind of lemons style. So you could have Porsches and you could have Geo metros in the same race but. So yeah, that's just kind of how it is. It doesn't. Really matter kind of run what? You bring kind of kind of thing. 

John 

OK, so it so it is that you could have a full size V8 rear wheel drive American made or American car running against a front wheel drive lower horsepower. 

Camp 

Yep. Yep. Good. Yep. 

John 

Wow. And that is just every man for himself or that is you're racing the clock still? 

Camp 

It's kind of hard to say because it's endurance. Racing. It's not, it's. You know, overall it's who crosses the finish line first, but in class racing it's more about survival. You know, like whoever can get to the finish line. In class 1st. 

John 

I see. 

Speaker 

Kind of thing. 

Camp 

So yeah, that's kind of how that works for us. 

John 

Well, you're teaching me because I see it and I stumble across it and I say, oh, that's pretty cool, but I'm not deep involved in it as you are. So again, I'm learning today so. 

Camp 

I learn every day. Man, it's fun. 

John 

You have to, you have to learn, learn something, learn one thing at minimum a day. 

Jason 

And Speaking of learning Lily, I want to find out from you it like, obviously you it. It started off with a with a game that I'm sure that your dad's probably maybe kicking himself a little bit. Now for getting. Into that game at 40. $9, whatever happens to be but. We look ahead now and here. You. Are you're you've been racing? For a few years. Have you had any? Formal racing experience or not experience, formal racing, training, schooling. Or anything like that to get you. Better equipped to do what you're doing. 

Lily 

I haven't had any schooling. The team I'm with, Kurt Britt Motorsports. When I just happened to join their team a few months back, they welcomed me in with open arms and just basically like showed me the way because the our past team wasn't that very great. So they're like, hey, come to our team, we'll show you guys basically everything and just did. 

Jason 

Well, that's good because you know when you when you join any sort of a team or partnership, you've all got to be part of the same team. You all gotta work together. And if it's helping you to learn something new, then all of that experience from everybody else around you helps you do better, helps the team do better, right. So it's good to see that they're. We're kind. Able to work with you and be that welcoming into this new team. So what are? What are some of the aspirations? What are your some of your ambitions? What do you? Want to move? Forward to do. After doing what you're doing right now. 

Lily 

To be completely honest with you, I'm not completely sure I'm right now. Just on the road, just seeing like where I can go with this, like see if I can make a name for myself. See like just where. I can go with this to be honest. 

John 

Well, that that definitely works and sometimes you have to get extremely comfortable with what you are doing currently to even begin to think about moving on a transition to something different, because if you don't it, it becomes that you kind of get a little. Bit scattered so. I think you're. In a good bet. Master one thing at a time. 

Jason 

Jordan, I want to direct that same question back to you. Is, is there any formal training, any formal racing schools that you've done to do what you're doing now or is it all just been experienced? 

Jordan 

No, actually the biggest thing that helped me going into the racing was probably have to be eye racing, watching lots of onboard videos going into it, I kind. 

Speaker 

Yeah, there. 

Jordan 

Of I mean, I'm not going to lie. I was nervous trying to kind of not show it, and I never asked. Anyone never asked anyone what to do and I regret it. This day, because everyone's so nice, I mean. I was racing with the All Star Circuit champions that we'd support and the guy came up to me and no idea who he is. He start helping us out and then he goes go watch. This is what you need to do. Sure enough, one up there and watch and he was 100% crap. So I get back after the feature. We did real well beat some really, really good. Guys in our area and come. Back out of the. Future like who are you? He was real good guy in late models. He's actually really close in our series and ever since then he's been helping us and he's been really mentoring me this year and but getting into it, I've I had, I did it all on my own, just kind of watching videos and doing lots and lots of hours fire racing. 

John 

Yeah, that's very important. We, we always talk about learning with your mouth shut and that's a very important thing everybody needs to. Learn because you can stumble through the dark and kind of poke at everything and learn from your mistakes. That's super great, but sometimes in racing, you know you learn from your mistakes upside down and you're going to you're going to get too, too hot in the corner or something. You're going to crash, but somebody else can tell you, hey, if you do this or you do that. It'll kind of take their experience and you can tune it to fit yourself. And I think that's something that everyone in, in any aspect of any career. Certainly should take to heart. That's how I did. That's how I learned. I learned just from bugging other people that I could see the things that I liked and I was the kid on the bicycle riding to someone's house, watching them pinstripe, and I was the one that annoyed all of. The older folks. It, it's a good way to learn. So everybody needs to continue that and I respect what you're doing. 

Speaker 

Thank you. 

Jason 

And camp, you mentioned earlier that you, you are actually working for a Ford racing. School at the moment. 

Camp 

Yes, Sir, I do. Yeah, it's pretty. It's pretty fun. Yeah. It's a good time for. 

Jason 

Sure. So obviously, but not just working there, obviously you must have a little bit of an inside scoop on you know getting things done as far as racing goes. I mean, obviously if you're working there, you must be either on the receiving end, maybe you're maybe you're doing some instructing. For you as part of. The as part of the school. 

Camp 

To an extent, you know, I work with a lot of people that are a lot smarter than I am. Guys that have competed in LMP and petite lemons. And so I get a lot of good insight from those guys for sure. But yeah, we have this thing called the skid car and it's fun has taught me a lot of car control, and I've learned about the business. Side of racing and how kind of how that functions and how things come together, you know. It's a lot. More of that than actually driving for us. It's pretty interesting though. It's been, it's been a good experience. For sure. 

John 

Now camp I've read in your bio that you've been involved with stunt drivers. Have you have you? Had a little bit of that, a little, a little thrown into that at. 

Camp 

All. Yeah, I work with one of those. A stunt driver. He's pretty cool and I've, I've, I've learned a lot from him. He's, you know, done TV shows and movies. And I've always loved watching stunt drivers. I grew up on Top Gear USA and Tanner Foust was. Always the guy to watch. So I've watched his career forever and ever and rallycross and all the stuff that he's done and. So yeah, I've always. Loved the stunt driving aspect of it, for sure, and I've learned a lot about car control from guys like that. 

John 

Right. Have you gotten into that or been able to be a part of that or my favorite thing, did you get to ski a car yet? 

Camp 

No, I have not. I wish maybe one day in the. Future, but not. Yet not yet. 

Jason 

We're going around the table and I and I always like to find out a little bit of some of your successes and. Lily, I'm going to. Start with you. What's your biggest success so far since you've been raising? What's the biggest thing that's kind of that, that crown that that's made you feel like I've done this? 

Lily 

My biggest success, I would say right now is I just went back-to-back winning the state championship for Ohio. 

Jason 

Nice, good for you. 

Speaker 

Thank you. 

Jason 

Jordan, how about you? Same question. What's the biggest thing that you've that you can put that crown on to say you'll look, I've done this. I've. 

Jordan 

Probably honestly, just the season in general, it's been a really phenomenal year. We won four championships in the 305 division, ended the year with eight wins, 2 swept weekends. It was phenomenal year more than what we could ever expect. 

Jason 

That's awesome. Camp, same question to you. I know that you know we always want to hear those big moments and again, you know, reading through your bio. You've already accomplished quite a bit. So what? What's the one thing that that you that you would have to say stands out? 

Camp 

The most of everything, that's always a big mark in every racist career, but to come out and get second in your first race, it felt amazing come out of the gate firing and you know, of course we want to keep that momentum up because my racing career. Far, very short. I've been racing since August so, but yeah, definitely. That's the king right now is the second place in the first race. 

John 

Now camp again. Read in your bio. You had an accident, explained that, and it was. It was near the Virginia International Raceway. Kind of kind of talking through that. Is that terrifying thing? What happened? 

Camp 

I did. So my first race was at VIR, but about 20 minutes down the road I was coming back from school just for like, fall break or something like that and I got hit by. A truck and. We rolled like four or five times and it definitely shook me up for a little while, especially A streetcar cause streetcars to. Me, I don't feel. Safe in a Street car. As I do in a race car, but. Yeah, we landed on our roof and we were told like we. Shouldn't have made. It out of this one. I mean, I drove an old truck. I drove like a 2000 Toyota 4 runner, so it had. Like 1 airbag and like nothing so. 

Lily 

Yeah, it shook me. 

Camp 

Up. I definitely didn't like being in cars for a little while. I didn't even like. Riding in cars so you know, it definitely took me some time to come back, but once I started working with Ford Racing it, it got me back in the car, kind of forced me. To get back. In the car, so I. Kind of worked through that. And I was able to hop back in a race car. But yeah, it definitely was a. Rattling experience to say and. 

John 

And you were driving or? 

Speaker 

OK. 

Camp 

You were. I was driving. Yeah, I was driving home and I had a I had a friend with me. And that's kind of what scared me more than anything because. You know, I had someone with me, and if something happens to them, it's my responsibility. And, like, you know, yeah, but yeah, it rattled me for. A little while for sure. 

Jason 

And both, obviously you and. Your friend have kind of. Made a full recovery and everything's good. 

Camp 

We were able to crawl out of. The car with very minimal scratches they got out with nothing on them. I had a little bit of glass here and there but. Lucky. Very, very lucky to walk. Away from that. 

Jason 

Well, even though you're driving a vehicle that's 20 plus years old, that doesn't mean they're not safe. Still, right? So that's the that's the key there. I do want to talk a little bit about your guys's future and to find out what your what, what your. 

Jordan 

Right. 

Jason 

Goals are I mean. Let's put racing aside for just a moment. Your professional careers. Lily, do you see yourself somewhere in the future? Is there something that you want to do outside of racing to say this is my career? 

Lily 

Honestly, I don't know yet of what I honestly want to do in life because racing's just basically been what I've done yet, and my family's all like, well, you gotta think of something else just in case breaks. Thing falls through and I just. I haven't thought of that thing yet, so. I don't know what I want to do in life. 

Jason 

Well, and that's OK cause again when you're still young and even in high school, there's a lot of, there's a lot of kids that that are being pressured to go do certain things, you know, get that four year degree and go $100,000 in debt and then have no job. When you're done. You know we here at the Get Out N Drive Podcast we want to see people. Get back into the trades, whether it be, you know, mechanics, body work, even if it's plumbing, electrical, whatever happens to be get into these trades and see where that takes. Because a four year degree with no job is not putting food on the table, you know we just want to see people, you know, young people moving forward and it's OK at such a young age to not know what that looks like yet. You know, Jordan, you're 18. You must be pretty close to your senior. Year if not already. Graduated. What's your ambition like? What do you what do you wanna do outside of racing? That you can call yourself a career XYZ? What? What is that? 

Jordan 

So I actually graduated just this like I'm actually graduating now, but I'm actually working full time. At a sawmill? I'm running a payloader well wheel loader. Some will call it, but I call it a payloader, but I can run the Payloader sawmill. The drill, you know it's been a real good journey. I interned there through Posties for two years, so I started off right out of high school the first day I graduated. You know it was. It's been great so far. 

Jason 

And a lot of people don't even look at heavy equipment as a trade, and by golly it's straight up there with things like trucking and. Stuff like that. People have got to. Do it you know. And it takes a skilled person. I've tried my hand at things like that before. I'm not the guy behind the wheel of a payloader or bulldozer. Those are pretty straightforward. Those are fun. But yeah, if someone someone's got to do that and it's great that you've already got that job that you kind of a little bit of a career path. Already set camp. What say you? What? What are some of the things that you that or what is the thing that you are looking forward? To doing as. A career? Maybe you're already doing it. 

Camp 

Yeah. So I'm still in school. I'm getting a sports management degree. Motorsports is. Always been kind of my thing. So you know, whatever I can do kind of down the road in Motorsports I. You know, whether it's kind of doing what Kyle is doing, doing management and you know being an agent or something like that to stay in the sports industry. That's kind of what I would like to do is say racing doesn't work. 

John 

Well, I know we're asking questions of everyone and I have something I know we touched on family and things of understanding what you do your friends. Understand what you do or do they support what you do and as teachers as well? Do they understand what you do and support what you do? Camp we'll start with you. 

Camp 

Yeah. You know, a lot of my friends that I've made have been from the car scene here in town, or I played high school football and a lot of those guys are. They're into that because we're like minded. One of my best friends actually he comes and plays gas man every once in. A while and. So he definitely is on board with it and but yeah. And you know most of my schooling's online. So it makes it easy to kind of work around that schedule. Anyways so. Yeah, but I'd say most of the people that are around me and. My life support it for. 

John 

Sure, Lily. 

Lily 

I would say that all my friends and teachers, they support it. They're like, Oh my gosh, this is so cool. I've like, never had a race car driver go through the school before low alone, meet one, but they all support and they understand that there's going to be days where I'm missing some going to national events and stuff like that. They'll understand. They're like good luck. Uh, yeah. You basically can make it up when you. 

John 

Get back and Jordan. I know you said you've graduated, but what was your? 

Jordan 

A little bit 5050. You know, people always support it. People love it around here in my little town. But you know, it's tough when you have to miss, you know, people like my friends have known for 1617 years. We were born pretty much month away. My mom watched my friends. You know, it's tough when you gonna miss your graduation parties. You know, I'm I almost missed my own graduation party. Actually, I missed. I'll practice qualifiers. I just showed up and ran the feature and went from 14th to 1st, but it it's difficult, but people support it and try to understand it. And it it's definitely hard on everyone around you. Know and we. Me personally, we're family owned. We run about a 40 race schedule per year, so it's tough. 

John 

Yeah, yeah, I see it. Like people that that do are involved in pretty heavy in sports or gymnastics and things like that. I see that the oral rate. You just don't see a lot of people doing that and that are that are in school in high school, but you see a lot of people doing gymnastics and they go to a national or a global gymnastic event. And that seems to be pretty commonplace. But I need to skip school, quote UN quote, skip school so I can go to a Sprint car race. And your teacher is going to look at you. 

Jordan 

Yeah, they are. They are. They always dead. And the teachers around here and there, they don't really understand it. I tried a million times. There's only a few, you know, though, they're just kind of like, you know, go do it, do it. This is what you want to do with how passionate you are. And then there's somewhere it's like. You need to go to college. You need to do this. You need to do that. Why are you missing your English class to go? Race some race car and. And it's people like that that just will never understand it. And you don't even, you know, sometimes you just give up trying, I mean. 

John 

That's, that's and. And the reason I asked because that's what happened to me personally. And having graduated so many years ago, but. I had argument with my art teacher that said you'll never get any more drawing cards. You know, never do this. You'll never do that. And they were always Debbie Downer about everything. And I'm very surprised that that was happening at the time, and I'm glad to see that others are supportive in this day and age. 

Jason 

Yeah, I think that you. Know we look back and. You know, there's certain things that people are. Good at if you're in high school and you're good academically, there's a support system for that. If you're in high school and you are athletic. There's a support system for that, even if you're artistic, there's a support system for that. If you're musically inclined, support system for that. But they've gone and they've taken all these traits. When you're in high school, there's so many different support teams or support groups for whatever. It is you're. Good at, but they started taking the trades out of schools like carpentry, metal shop, automotive shop and all. Of a sudden. Those are left to the sidelines and when guys like Jordan and camp and gals. Like Lily, want to grow up in high school? Learning about mechanics, learning about racing, learning about cars? There's no support system for that, and it's a shame that. And I'm not saying that's exclusionary to every school because some schools do take that on and they do that and I commend them for doing so. But you know, we want our listeners out there who have children, teenagers who are aspiring to do things like racing or mechanics or body work or carpentry or whatever. Happens to be. That there are programs out there like the RPM foundation that can help you get into programs to do exactly what camp and Lily and Jordan are doing right here with within our little group. To want to pursue those careers in racing, for instance. So you know, if you guys don't know who the RPM foundation, we scratch their back, they scratch our do with them is to help promote them and that's why we do national, get out and drive day is to raise awareness of. Organizations like the RPM Foundation that's going to help kids like Camp Lily and John. To move forward in these careers where there may not be the support system that they need to do what they love, John, if anything I missed in there, feel free to jump in. And help fill that gap. 

John 

You are right on it. We try to support the next generation and that is exactly who we're speaking to today. I think everyone involved with us today for taking some time out and explaining their career and where they plan on going gathered a lot of information. I've learned a lot from each one of our guests today and I've had fun. 

Jason 

I've had a blast as well. We should make sure we thank not just camp Lily and Jordan, but we also want to thank Tanya as well as Kyle from Kyle Locker racing. Kyle was a future, so was a was a featured guest of ours not that long ago. We had a great time to check, chat with him and it's good to. See him helping out this next generation as well. Moving these guys forward because we're excited to see where you guys go in the future. And someday when we turn on that TV, we want to see your guys's names in lights. Guys. Thanks so much for being a part of the get and drive. Podcast is. There any final words that you guys want to share before we let you go? 

Camp 

Thank you guys for having us on. It's been fun. 

Jordan 

No, thank you. 

Lily 

Thanks no. 

John 

Well, very good, everyone listening to this go to GetOutNDrive.com and find our tab and support the RPM foundation and support everyone else that is in in the racing. Community that is a youth. Awesome. Great show. Thanks guys. 

Announcement 

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John 

What drives you?